Tag Archives: Well being

piglets asleep together

CALM SLEEP – How to approach Sleep Hygiene for a better nights rest

Sleep is an essential part of our wellbeing. It helps our bodies to recover and regenerate and keeps us sharp and productive. Sleep deprivation is so detrimental to wellbeing that it was utilised in the 1600’s by self styled Witch Hunter General Matthew Hopkins as a means of eliciting confessions from accused witches. Its says something for the pain and torment of sleep that a confession to witchcraft would be seen as a preferable option!

According to the NHS, the average adult human needs around 7-9 hours of sleep per night. According to one survey however, an astonishing 30% of us have had insomnia at some point. There are a myriad of potential causes that lead to insomnia such as shift work, mental health conditions, pain etc.

Acknowledging that the underlying causes can be difficult to control, a common contributor to poor sleep is sleep hygiene. Sleep hygiene is not (as was once suggested to me) how often we clean our nightclothes. Its the routines and habits leading into our bedtime that can influence how we sleep. Addressing these, even if you think that sleeping is not a big problem for you, could ring in the benefits to your mental wellness.

I spend a lot of time talking these things through with my patients so to make things easier I have created a simple mnemonic of sleep habits that could help you to streamline your bedtime. If you are struggling with sleep, or have poor energy that might be linked to quality of sleep, I recommend you try CALM SLEEP, a few simple rules and ideas that could tidy up your sleep hygiene and send you into a more blissful land of nod to help your body and mind recover from the rigours of life!

C – Comfort.
Woman lying on a comfortable bed

Going to bed should be a pleasure and making it comfortable is going to help this no end. To give a balanced view, some researcher in the 1950’s concluded that theres little difference in the amount of sleep time we get between sleeping on a board or sleeping on a sprung mattress. I’m going to be honest, I haven’t read the whole study because I am never going to recommend sleeping on a board. Perhaps the difference between a sprung mattress and a board wasn’t so great in the 1950’s. Whatever this study says, most of us would agree that being comfortable at night enhances our sleep. A decent mattress, bedding and pillows makes our bed a place we want to go to. I know it can run expensive but if we are getting the recommended amount of sleep most nights then we are spending a third of our lives in bed. This has to be worth the investment.

A – Avoid.

There are many avoids before bedtime to aid good sleep but the highlights are caffeine, alcohol and eating too late.

Theres a lot of conflicting advice about the effects of caffeine and alcohol on our general health. Barely a week goes by when I’m not picking up a news article that bestows the benefits or calamities of moderate to heavy consumption. One area of agreement however is the effect on sleep that even moderate consumption can have. With caffeine, as we know, it keeps us awake. The advice I give to maximise sleep is avoid caffeine in the afternoon completely and keep overall consumption moderate. beware also that we aren’t just talking coffee and tea. Unfortunately caffeine can also be found in other places like chocolate so be aware that your evening treat could be having an effect too.

With regard to eating, a full stomach before bed leaves our bodies with a world of work to do when we should be sleeping. You may recall from my last blog on diet the old proverb, “Eat breakfast like an emperor, lunch like a King and dinner like a pauper”. Supporting good sleep is another reason to look at this model of eating. If you can’t face switching your habits, at least make sure you give yourself a few hours between the last mouthfuls and counting the sheep!

L – Light Control.

This is a subject we are becoming moderately aware of but which I feel has a much greater part to play in our overall health. Our bodies respond to light by releasing or suppressing the release of a hormone called melatonin that aids sleep. Studies have found that blue light in particular mimicked daylight (something to do with the wavelength) and guess what? Blue light is emitted by phone, tablets and laptops. How many of us are sitting in bed on devices? This works at both ends of the day. Getting a bit of sunlight in the morning can help to switch off the melatonin and get the body moving.

One of the issues in the western world is that we don’t adapt top our natural environment. Work and school starts at 9 winter summer or fall yet the seasons change and our bodies want to change with it. I believe its a major reason behind Seasonal Affective Disorder as I detailed in an article on the subject some years ago. Regrettably the world is unlikely to change anytime soon so the best we can do in the meantime is to try an mould ourselves around it. Small investments like a natural light clock to wake up to in the morning could help as well as paying attention to getting things switched off at the other end of the day

M – Mellow.

I contemplated making this one meditate but I accept that not everyone has or is going to start this journey. What we can all do however is look at how we slow down in the evenings.

When I ask the question – “How do you relax” to my patients, the most popular answer by a country mile is watching TV. I always challenge this. When was the last time you watched something truly relaxing on TV? Its not designed for that. TV is meant to get its audience engaged, whatever your choice of programme. Documentaries get us thinking, soap operas draw us into the drama and don’t even get me started on the news. The only truly disengaging thing i can ever remember seeing on TV in the last 46 years was the test card and even that had an annoying high pitched noise accompanying it.

Our minds have got enough to do at night filing away a days worth of memories. Calming things down before we go to sleep is going to help avoid that tumultuous brain working overtime when we are trying to drop off. Try listening to relaxing music or reading if meditations not your thing but do try to avoid the Uber excitement at least an hour before lights out.

S – Schedule.

Following a routine is the first thing to look at with sleep. The body has a natural clock called the circadian rhythm which adapts according to our habits. Following a routine at night, especially with regard to the time we go to bed and the time we rise helps our body to take care of the natural functions that aid this such as releasing the sleep hormone melatonin.

L – Leave.

Woman clinging onto a large clockThis really belongs further down but then the mnemonic wouldn’t work! Leave is for those struggling to sleep and what it means is get up, remove yourself for the bedroom and go somewhere else if you cant sleep. The rationale behind this is that we start to develop negative associations with our bedroom and the insomnia cycle becomes self perpetuating. Experts advise going somewhere quiet, reading a book for a few minutes and then returning to your bed to try again.

E – Exercise.

The relationship between exercise and sleep is well made with the advice being that even moderate activity improves duration and quality of sleep. it also helps us to wake and get going.

I always understood there was a caveat to when you exercise because too vigorous too close to bed had an opposite effect. According to the sleep foundation however, recent studies suggest that this doesn’t apply to everyone so I guess its a case of what works for you.

E – Environment.

This is something I feel very strongly about. Now I’m not a Feng Shui expert by any manner or means but it makes complete sense to me that our bedrooms should reflect the peace and tranquility we would hope to associate with a good nights sleep. Lots of clutter cannot allow for a free flowing energy.

baby sleeping on someones armRemember, our bedrooms are places to sleep. They are not for watching TV, or evoking memories or anything else. I recommend tidying up, Marie Kondo the drawers and leave only a few calming objects or pictures out.

I’d also like to discuss the issue of mirrors. According to some traditional belief, our ethereal soul leaves the body at night to wander (it is further believed that if you dream about someone your ethereal souls have met!). If it sees a reflection in the mirror it becomes startled which in can cause us to have nightmares. I recommend draping something over the mirror at night or better still, just don’t have one in there.

P – Professionals.

If you’ve done all of this and you are still struggling it might be time to speak to the professionals. Sleep deprivation is linked to a number of physical and mental health disorders and we should suffer in silence.

So there you have it.  A summary of sleep in a neat little mnemonic.  Please bear in mind that as with everything, if we spend a lifetime developing bad habits, transforming to new ones and seeing the benefit won’t happen over night.  With tenacity however you will ring in the changes.

Tony is a qualified acupuncturist with clinics across east Anglia. He is also the founder and a director of Talking FreEly, an organisation campaigning to break down the stigma of mental illness through honest and open conversations.

If you are interested in learning more about how Tony could help you to achieve your well being goals please get in touch or book an appointment at one of his clinics.

Vegetables

Eating for Wellbeing – 5 non nutritional tips for improving Diet


Diet. The very word is enough to cast fear. Its one of those words that has gradually developed and links now to both nutrition and how we fuel our body and less positive associations with weight loss, body image and feelings of dissatisfaction about how we and others see ourselves. However you perceive the word diet, its rarely far from our thoughts and has become a multi million dollar industry.

In my previous post, The Four Pillars of Wellbeing, I discussed how diet stands alone and interacts as one of the pillars upon which our wellbeing stands. Many excesses or deficiencies in our diet can lead to chronic health problems which will affect both our physical and mental function. In fact, some studies have found a direct link between the food we eat and conditions such as depression.

Good wellbeing has to incorporate a discussion on food but I would like to start mine by saying very clearly that I am not a nutritionist. Furthermore, I have to confess that of my four pillars of wellbeing, it is the area I struggle with the most personally. My approach to diet in the context of wellbeing is not nutritional based. The world is awash with different nutritional models or diets which you may already be following for a specific outcome be it performance, weight loss, health management, ethical or religious principles etc. Motivation behind what we do or don’t eat is personal and I am not here to judge or opine on the benefits or otherwise of calories counting, carbs vs protein, vegan, vegetarian or any other permutation. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is rooted in an energetic model of health and food can influence the manner in which the bodies energy moves and balances. These energetic properties differ within specific food groups so it is usually possible to tailor an existing diet by swapping one food for another or adding in something to counteract another. This is where I confine my guidance.

What follows therefore is not a lecture or secret formula for killer abs. There are plenty of places that offer these promises if that’s what you are looking for. These are simply some guidelines that will help you build your wellbeing from the foundations you already have.

1. The manner in which food is eaten is as important as the food itself

This is probably the most common dietary transgression I see. Increasingly people have become more aware of what they eat but the habit of “grab it and go” seems more deeply ingrained. A sandwich in front of the computer, breakfast in the car, dinner by the TV all common 21st Century habits. Not only does eating in a hurried fashion like this affect the pleasure we derive from food but also the way we digest it.

Mindful EatingIn order to tackle this I recommend mindful eating. Mindfulness is another area of health I find commonly that we don’t find time for and combining these enhances both our digestion and our senses. Eat quietly, at a table taking time to focus on the taste and other senses associated with eating. I realise it is more time consuming but its important and if you really don’t feel you have time to do this you may benefit from taking a more holistic view of what is driving your life. My post on work-life balance may help.

2. Eat breakfast like an emperor

This is from an old proverb, Eat breakfast like an Emperor, lunch like a King and dinner like a pauper. Its in stark contrast to how the majority of us eat with the main meal coming later in the day. If any meal is going to hit the cutting room floor, it’s normally breakfast. But think about it for a minute, it doesn’t make sense. Firstly, we need the energy from our food during the day and secondly, we digest better when we are awake, not asleep. Why then would we load up just before bedtime? Some studies have shown that addressing when calories are consumed as oppose to how many can help to combat obesity.

Western lifestyle does not help us to follow this advice and most of us would baulking at the thought of getting up even earlier to prepare a proper meal in the morning. If however we can make even small progressions towards this it’s a step in the right direction. Firing your metabolism up in the morning should be an essential start to the day and skipping breakfast, a non option.

3. Cereal and toast are not compulsoryBowl of food

Building on tip 2, another issue for me personally (and one Ive heard echoed from my patients) is that the traditional mainstays of a (weekday) British breakfast is frankly unappealing. Some people love their toast and cereal but for others, like me, it just doesn’t do it. Now a fry up is something I can get excited about but lets face it, eating that every morning would get tedious eventually not to mention what it would do for the waistline.

My approach to breakfast is to eat what I fancy. I recently travelled to Myanmar where the traditional dish is Mohinger, a noodle soup. I have no problem digesting this first thing so frequently eat this type of dish or similar. The picture is a miso soup I knocked up in a matter of minutes with veg and poached egg.  The key for me is to eat something that appeals and remains basically healthy. Don’t be afraid to bend the rules. Stuck for inspiration? Why not take a look at what people eat around the world.

4. Food energetics can be altered within existing nutritional models

One of the challenges of using a traditional model of health in a modern world is that our goals may be in conflict with one another. Wellbeing in the 21st century is often closely aligned with personal goals like fitness which also place a nutritional demand on the body. We could argue about the virtues of different nutritional models or approaches to wellbeing but I find its far easier to seek the middle ground and find an approach in which our various lifestyle demands can coexist.

Within an energetic model of health, such as TCM, part of the “balancing” that forms the foundation of treatment is looking at the energetic properties of what we put in our bodies. The good news is that all foods have individual energetic properties that are independent of which nutritional group they belong to. Likewise, the manner in which food is prepared can also add to the energetic qualities. Refining your diet to achieve better balance should therefore usually be possible without compromising existing health models. For example, grapefruit and lemon are both citrus fruits but one is Yin and the other is Yang. These subtle differences can be found right across the supermarket so finding a compromise for all but the strictest or fussiest of eaters should be possible.

5. Be wary of the experts

I say this with the very best of intentions but the increased use of social media over the last few years has seen the emergence of a new generation of unregulated “expert”, the influencer. Sometimes they are subject matter experts who are well studied and informed. Sometimes they are people who have done something that worked for them and feel compelled to share this with the world. They may look great and speak with conviction but it doesn’t make them right.

Developing good eating habits will undoubtedly benefit our wellbeing but if you have specific needs relating to your food you should seek the advice of someone who has the time to understand your individual needs and is properly qualified to offer an opinion.

 

Tony is a qualified acupuncturist with clinics across east Anglia. He is also the founder and a director of Talking FreEly, an organisation campaigning to break down the stigma of mental illness through honest and open conversations.

If you are interested in learning more about how tony could help you to achieve your well being goals please get in touch or book an appointment at one of his clinics.

Family In the park

7 Tips for improving Mental Health

In the last couple of years the world has had a serious mental health wake up call. Barely a day passes now without a news article or social media post drawing attention to a problem that has existed since time began but has gone largely unnoticed.

Let’s make no mistake. Mental Illness has been a big problem for a number of years. What is driving the change in attitudes now is likely a greater awareness brought about because some very high profile individuals have spoken out and a greater understanding of the financial and personal costs of poor mental health. Regardless of the reasons, a greater awareness of our mental wellness and willingness to discuss it more openly can only be a positive thing in terms of wellbeing.

Mental Health or Mental illness?

I do think however that it is very important to make a distinction between mental illness and mental health. We tend not to use the word mental illness because it is surrounded by Stigma, substituting it for “mental health problems”. Unfortunately this muddies the water a little so let me set out how I see the language.

Mental health is something we all have. It is part of our overall health, separated at some point in time in medical terms, and governs how we think and feel about ourselves. The homeostatic place for our mental capacity is that we fluctuate gently between a range of emotions in a socially accepted response to a range of stimulus from the outside world. If for whatever reason the homeostasis is disrupted and a particular emotion starts to predominate we may start to behave in a way that is not considered socially normal or acceptable (I use this definition because, after all, who defines what normal is!). We may become irrational, withdrawn or even psychotic. At this point we are becoming mentally ill.

Mental health and Physical health

Like physical health, there are aspects of your mental health that are utterly beyond your control. Equally there are aspects of mental health that are influenced by lifestyle and adopting a healthier approach can reap benefits.

Of all the pillars of wellbeing, mental health is the one I have spent the most time contemplating, researching and engaging with. My understanding and opinion is ever changing but one of the things I feel most confident in asserting is that time spent figuring out what makes you tick is rarely time wasted.

What follows therefore is not a rule book or magic formula for zen level contentment. It is simply a collection of ideas that may help you to develop positive mental health.

1. Understand your own mental health

cup of coffee and open books

I am a firm believer that self awareness is the most important aspect of changing your mental health.  For many of us, the first time we will become aware of our mental health is when it becomes a problem.  Taking time to think about what makes you tick first however could help you to identify where your possible triggers may lie and help you to avoid them in the first place.  This may seem like quite an overwhelming task but there are plenty of resources out there that can help.  In his book, The Chimp Paradox, professor Steve Peters discusses the relationships between various parts of our brain that govern emotional and rationality thinking and how these develop in response to our experiences.  I found it an extremely useful way to explore and understand my own psychology as the basis of my mental health.  

Without understanding, your efforts at training are potentially shots in the dark.  When we first visit a gym, we may have no idea of where our strengths and weaknesses lie.  Once we’ve pumped a bit of weight or stepped out on the treadmill we will have a clearer idea and this can help to focus our training.  

As a side note, I’m not sponsored to promote anyone’s work or product. I happened to find this book particularly useful but I acknowledge it may not be for everyone and there are a raft of other resources out there that may be equally useful.  

2. Balance activity with rest

Any athlete will tell you that the harder you train, the more rest you require.  Its a simple balance of Yin and Yang.  When it comes to resting mentally I find people are generally less aware of what constitutes rest. TV for example is rarely relaxing.  It is usually emotive or stimulating.  After all, it is designed to entertain.  We could be lulled into thinking we are resting because our bodies aren’t moving however all  the while however our brains are ticking away, processing the information.

In my humble opinion, 21st century human beings are over stimulated. Information is fired at us left right and centre and for many, we have simply lost the art of being still.  Because of this I strongly recommend developing a mindfulness practise.  Mindfulness is a form of meditation that allows us to focus on what is happening right now as oppose to past or future events.  It sounds simple enough but once you engage in a mindful practise you will be astonished at how much time is spent thinking in either past or future terms.  If you need anymore convincing the mainstream media are frequently bestowing its benefits as seen in this well balanced article.

Mindfulness can help us to give the mind a break and in time that will become more than just something we do for ten minutes a day.  It becomes a skill to manage some of the more difficult aspects of life.

3. Don’t expect overnight results

This is another casualty of our modern world where we no longer have to wait for anything.  Our expectations have moved, often unrealistically.  If I want to develop 32” biceps its going to take time.  If I am recovering from a shoulder injury, its going to take even longer.  Patience is the key.  Its harder because we struggle to see the results however in time, if we stick with it we will start to feel the results.

Brain Training

4. Consider how the other pillars of wellbeing influence your mental health

This really harks back to my first post introducing the four pillars of wellbeing.  Ultimately, wellness is not held up by one aspect of health.  If we want to be resilient we will want to stand our wellbeing on four Saturday pillars, each of which is helping the load of the other.  It can help us to consider our health in individual terms but there is plenty of cross over.  For example, how we eat can have an effect on our mental health as seen in this link from MIND.

Mental health can affect sleep and sleep can affect mental health.  The best way to approach your mental health is to sit down with a piece of paper and think about various aspects of lifestyle and how they may be affecting you.  A few key areas to think about could be sleep routine, social media use, alcohol and caffeine consumption.  This is by no means exhaustive but is a nice starting point.

Remember, we are all individuals

This reminds me of my favourite line in life of Brian where the entire crowd repeat this sentence.  There is a tendency to think of our health in a one size fits all model.  My training and career as a holistic therapist has taught me that no two people are truly alike.  We all bring subtle differences so whilst I very much advocate open and honest conversation about mental health with the sharing of ideas, we never the less should be aware that what worked for one may not work for another.  This doesn’t mean it or you have failed, just that you have different needs and should try something else.

Reach out for help if you need it

This is where our old friend stigma comes in again.  I’m afraid it is also an opportunity for me to use another physical health analogy (yes repetitive but unapologetic, it gets the message across). My local green has someone training under the watchful eye of a personal trainer nearly every day at some point in time.  Most of the people in my social circle engage in some type of regular physical activity under the watchful eye of a trainer, coach or professional.  In my family it is Karate.  In others it is Yoga or Pilates or whatever.  For those who run or cycle the help may be less formal, working instead in pairs or small groups.  When we take a bump we will ask someone to put a plaster on or give the area a rub.  If the injury is more serious we usually seek professional help.  What I’m saying is that we all understand that our physical needs are usually better met under guidance or with support.

Consultation

Why then are we so reluctant to seek help for our mental health?  Stigma.  Its a tired line but in my opinion it cant be said enough.  reaching out for help with mental health is not a sign of weakness or failure.  It is a sign of common sense that you have recognised the limit of your own capabilities and need some help to either fix things or take you to the next level.  Mental health support can take many forms.  CBT, Counselling, Complementary therapy, Talking informally in groups like Talking FreEly  What is important is that we feel able to reach out when we need it

Be mindful of the end goal

A few months ago I posted a blog on Happiness.  To say it was highly controversial would be an overstatement but suffice to say it was divisive, some disagreeing with my assertion that we should not be striving for happiness.

I haven’t shifted my thinking here.  If you see the epitome of mental health as perpetual joy you are going to be disappointed.  Life can be hard.  Its a series of obstacles and challenges, some pleasing, others not.  Very few people navigate through life on a steady straight zen line.  We are always moving between highs and lows.  Its a natural process of life to experience a range of emotions according to what life presents us.  Instead the goal should be improving our capacity to cope or recover from the knocks and equally, not to get too carried away with the highs

Contact

Tony is a qualified acupuncturist with clinics across east Anglia. He is also the founder and a director of Talking FreEly, an organisation campaigning to break down the stigma of mental illness through honest and open conversations.

If you are interested in learning more about how Tony could help you or your organisation please get in touch or book an appointment at one of his clinics.

Happiness

Happiness – Why this should not be our wellbeing goal

I realise and acknowledge that this headline may not grab you as something your want to read.  I would like to assure you from the outset that I am not against happiness or spreading joy. Happiness is great, I love being happy.  Ive also had long periods of time when I wasn’t.  

The reason I feel compelled to write about this is that its very easy to get caught up in the drive of positivity online thats working furiously to counteract the equally negative world.  The problem with both of these stances is that they stand at the extremes of the spectrum as polar opposites and life just isn’t like that.  Ask any acupuncturist.  Life needs Yin and Yang!  

In my working and personal lives I have encountered unhappiness that is driven by unavoidable circumstances.  Tragedy, mental illness, relationships, all examples of the obstacles life throws at us often without warning. Sometimes its all we can do to survive (see my post on thrive v survive). 

This blog is not intended to trash happiness but to raise our awareness of how it fits into our emotional health.  I believe this awareness can help us to achieve a better sense of wellbeing.

Happiness isn’t always a selfless and wholesome thing that makes the world a better place

Happiness means different things to different people.  A wellbeing professional will understand the wholesome messages they are trying to portray but in the modern world, driven by consumerism happiness as is frequently wrapped up with the acquisition of goods. 

There are other extremes too. For example, some people feel happiness when they are driving a vehicle at break neck speeds or from stealing other peoples possessions.

These are not really measures of happiness but examples of quick highs or easy fixes.  They are of short duration and need constantly replacing.  They demonstrate that happiness in itself is not an exclusively virtuous or wholesome pathway.  It is by no means an absolute right to feel happy if there is a cost to others.

Spreading happiness won’t help everyone to feel better

Its nice to read positive stories to motivate us to fill our lives with joy.  All over the world, thousands of people will feel the benefit and I’m not knocking this.

We should be aware though that there is another side.  For some people, happiness is simply not within their grasp.  Problems like repression, life events and mental illness can be absolute barriers to happiness. The problem with flooding their world with happiness is that it simply reinforces their unhappiness. We see this particularly at Christmas time, when our community feels an overwhelming pressure to feel joyful. Its well documented that those suffering from depression, loneliness or isolation will feel the effects particularly at this time of year.

Happiness is not a permanent state of mind

Happiness is one of many emotions human beings feel and express.  Because its the one that makes us feel good its natural to think that we should aim to feel like that all the time.  There are reasons this is flawed.

Firstly, its probably unachievable.  If someone is unhappy, no amount of tom foolery or coercion is going to make them happy.  Telling someone to be happy is far more likely to make them feel miserable.

Secondly, its not appropriate.  The human mind is adapted to feel and express several different emotions in response to the situations we find ourselves in. For example, we feel fear when faced with danger. This is entirely appropriate and triggers a hormonal response in our bodies that alters how we function in preparation for responding to the threat. The natural expression of a broad range of emotions is normal, healthy and part of living a well balanced life. It becomes a problem when these emotions cant be switched off or become overly expressed. Happiness is no different. It would be highly inappropriate to feel happy when faced with a dangerous situation or grief.

This all sounds a bit pedantic.  Aren’t you just playing with words?

Maybe but life is littered with arguments about words and language.  Humans are evolving intellectually very quickly and our language has developed enormously in recent years. The addition of new words into our vocabulary and the change in culture have affected how we interpret language. We have a duty to take care over the choice of words we use and at very least to discuss and rationalise how we interpret themes. This isn’t judging something as right or wrong, simply opening the opportunity to broaden our discussions and consider different perspectives. 

How else do we measure wellbeing if not through happiness

Lets be clear, I’m not saying we shouldn’t be happy or to spread positive news.  What I am saying is we should be respectful of the complexity of human emotion.  Not everyone strives to be or can be happy and we shouldn’t take it personally when people dont feel like smiling or joining in the fun.

People should express all emotions freely and appropriately without fear of judgement or ridicule and perhaps a more achievable goal for wellbeing is to embrace this. 

Working towards “happiness” is fundamentally flawed as a life goal.  I advocate a values based approach, working to the best of our ability to do what we feel is right and aligns with the person we truly want to be. This would include self compassion and compassion for others.  If we follow this path, happiness may reward us along the way but we will achieve an overall sense of contentment and personal wellbeing.  In my opinion this is a more wholesome, achievable and sustainable goal.

I’m sure people will disagree with me. This is what makes us develop as human beings and I welcome the variety of opinion that supports or contradicts my own. That is after all what keeps the conversation going and the human mind developing. I hope you have enjoyed reading this and if so, or if not, please comment.