Tag Archives: TCM

Vegetables

Eating for Wellbeing – 5 non nutritional tips for improving Diet


Diet. The very word is enough to cast fear. Its one of those words that has gradually developed and links now to both nutrition and how we fuel our body and less positive associations with weight loss, body image and feelings of dissatisfaction about how we and others see ourselves. However you perceive the word diet, its rarely far from our thoughts and has become a multi million dollar industry.

In my previous post, The Four Pillars of Wellbeing, I discussed how diet stands alone and interacts as one of the pillars upon which our wellbeing stands. Many excesses or deficiencies in our diet can lead to chronic health problems which will affect both our physical and mental function. In fact, some studies have found a direct link between the food we eat and conditions such as depression.

Good wellbeing has to incorporate a discussion on food but I would like to start mine by saying very clearly that I am not a nutritionist. Furthermore, I have to confess that of my four pillars of wellbeing, it is the area I struggle with the most personally. My approach to diet in the context of wellbeing is not nutritional based. The world is awash with different nutritional models or diets which you may already be following for a specific outcome be it performance, weight loss, health management, ethical or religious principles etc. Motivation behind what we do or don’t eat is personal and I am not here to judge or opine on the benefits or otherwise of calories counting, carbs vs protein, vegan, vegetarian or any other permutation. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is rooted in an energetic model of health and food can influence the manner in which the bodies energy moves and balances. These energetic properties differ within specific food groups so it is usually possible to tailor an existing diet by swapping one food for another or adding in something to counteract another. This is where I confine my guidance.

What follows therefore is not a lecture or secret formula for killer abs. There are plenty of places that offer these promises if that’s what you are looking for. These are simply some guidelines that will help you build your wellbeing from the foundations you already have.

1. The manner in which food is eaten is as important as the food itself

This is probably the most common dietary transgression I see. Increasingly people have become more aware of what they eat but the habit of “grab it and go” seems more deeply ingrained. A sandwich in front of the computer, breakfast in the car, dinner by the TV all common 21st Century habits. Not only does eating in a hurried fashion like this affect the pleasure we derive from food but also the way we digest it.

Mindful EatingIn order to tackle this I recommend mindful eating. Mindfulness is another area of health I find commonly that we don’t find time for and combining these enhances both our digestion and our senses. Eat quietly, at a table taking time to focus on the taste and other senses associated with eating. I realise it is more time consuming but its important and if you really don’t feel you have time to do this you may benefit from taking a more holistic view of what is driving your life. My post on work-life balance may help.

2. Eat breakfast like an emperor

This is from an old proverb, Eat breakfast like an Emperor, lunch like a King and dinner like a pauper. Its in stark contrast to how the majority of us eat with the main meal coming later in the day. If any meal is going to hit the cutting room floor, it’s normally breakfast. But think about it for a minute, it doesn’t make sense. Firstly, we need the energy from our food during the day and secondly, we digest better when we are awake, not asleep. Why then would we load up just before bedtime? Some studies have shown that addressing when calories are consumed as oppose to how many can help to combat obesity.

Western lifestyle does not help us to follow this advice and most of us would baulking at the thought of getting up even earlier to prepare a proper meal in the morning. If however we can make even small progressions towards this it’s a step in the right direction. Firing your metabolism up in the morning should be an essential start to the day and skipping breakfast, a non option.

3. Cereal and toast are not compulsoryBowl of food

Building on tip 2, another issue for me personally (and one Ive heard echoed from my patients) is that the traditional mainstays of a (weekday) British breakfast is frankly unappealing. Some people love their toast and cereal but for others, like me, it just doesn’t do it. Now a fry up is something I can get excited about but lets face it, eating that every morning would get tedious eventually not to mention what it would do for the waistline.

My approach to breakfast is to eat what I fancy. I recently travelled to Myanmar where the traditional dish is Mohinger, a noodle soup. I have no problem digesting this first thing so frequently eat this type of dish or similar. The picture is a miso soup I knocked up in a matter of minutes with veg and poached egg.  The key for me is to eat something that appeals and remains basically healthy. Don’t be afraid to bend the rules. Stuck for inspiration? Why not take a look at what people eat around the world.

4. Food energetics can be altered within existing nutritional models

One of the challenges of using a traditional model of health in a modern world is that our goals may be in conflict with one another. Wellbeing in the 21st century is often closely aligned with personal goals like fitness which also place a nutritional demand on the body. We could argue about the virtues of different nutritional models or approaches to wellbeing but I find its far easier to seek the middle ground and find an approach in which our various lifestyle demands can coexist.

Within an energetic model of health, such as TCM, part of the “balancing” that forms the foundation of treatment is looking at the energetic properties of what we put in our bodies. The good news is that all foods have individual energetic properties that are independent of which nutritional group they belong to. Likewise, the manner in which food is prepared can also add to the energetic qualities. Refining your diet to achieve better balance should therefore usually be possible without compromising existing health models. For example, grapefruit and lemon are both citrus fruits but one is Yin and the other is Yang. These subtle differences can be found right across the supermarket so finding a compromise for all but the strictest or fussiest of eaters should be possible.

5. Be wary of the experts

I say this with the very best of intentions but the increased use of social media over the last few years has seen the emergence of a new generation of unregulated “expert”, the influencer. Sometimes they are subject matter experts who are well studied and informed. Sometimes they are people who have done something that worked for them and feel compelled to share this with the world. They may look great and speak with conviction but it doesn’t make them right.

Developing good eating habits will undoubtedly benefit our wellbeing but if you have specific needs relating to your food you should seek the advice of someone who has the time to understand your individual needs and is properly qualified to offer an opinion.

 

Tony is a qualified acupuncturist with clinics across east Anglia. He is also the founder and a director of Talking FreEly, an organisation campaigning to break down the stigma of mental illness through honest and open conversations.

If you are interested in learning more about how tony could help you to achieve your well being goals please get in touch or book an appointment at one of his clinics.

Does Acupuncture Hurt?

Today I want to deal with the elephant in the room.  The needles!  My work involves a lot of different skills, needling being just one of them, but theres no point in avoiding the obvious fact that if you book in for acupuncture, at some point (pun intended), we are going to face the needles.

The first thing to say about this is that almost everyone I see has some trepidation about needling.  Its common and its natural.  Lets put things into context.  Until now, your only experience of a needle is likely to be a pin prick, unpleasant, or worse a syringe, painful.

I believe that much of aversion to needles is built into our psychology from birth.  Its one of the first things a baby experiences these days when its brought into the world and in my opinion, its also a fairly classic betrayal of trust.  Consider the scenario from a babies eyes.  You are with your parent(s), the person(s) solely charged with your safety and development in the early years and someone with whom you have formed a loving and highly reliant bond.  You gaze lovingly into the eyes of this person who may be talking reassuringly to you as part of a distraction technique.  All of a sudden, WHAM!.  Into the backside with a big old needle.  Then you are pumped with a mild dose of something horrible that may make you ill for a few days.   I’d like to be clear, this isn’t an anti-vaccination stand point, but just think about the psychology for a moment. Is it any wonder most of us develop a thing with needles?

As the syringe is likely to have formed the fear of needles I find it useful to compare this to my own practise because acupuncture is about as far removed from a syringe as its possible to get (in needling terms anyway).  There are a few clear differences that make it so.

  1. The size of the needles.  Syringes are intended to either put something in or take something out of the body.  For this purpose they need a hole.  By comparison, acupuncture needles are not hollow  and this means they can be much smaller.  How much smaller? Acupuncture needles are roughly the size of a human hair.  In fact, Acupuncture needles are so fine that most people don’t feel them being inserted.
  2. The purpose of the needling.  Syringes are basically used for two purposes, putting something into your body or taking something out.  If its putting something in that will generally be a drug or vaccine, foreign substances which your body may object to.  If its to take something out thats usually blood and will involve going into a vein.  Veins in the normal scheme of things aren’t meant to be messed around with and as a consequence the body has an alarm system built around them to let us know something bad is happening.  In other words, it will hurt because its meant to.  Your body is warning you of danger.  Acupuncture needles by contrast do neither of these things so the natural pain response isn’t pre-built into what we are doing. In rare cases there may occasionally be some discomfort but this is relative to what we are trying to achieve and always very carefully managed and controlled.
  3. The reason and consent for the needling:  It is an easily overlooked fact but generally speaking, although you consent to being needled in a regular medical environment, your choices and control over wether or not you give this consent will be limited by whatever is going on with you medically.  There could be some pretty high stakes involved and if a doctor breaks out the needles theres likely to be a lot less “choice” in the real sense of the word.  By contrast, the acupuncture treatment room its much different.  Although our patients are often feeling very desperate it is normally conscious choice that has brought you there in the first place.  In all but a handful of cases coming for treatment will be a decision you have made yourself following some research.  I live for the day when acupuncture becomes the first line treatment for problems like back pain but until it does I rely on people coming because they know how well it can work, not because its the only thing the world can offer them.  Psychologically this very small shift in conscious thought makes a huge difference in how you personally approach treatment.

This is all well and good but accepting that acupuncture needles are not the same as syringes, what do they feel like?  It can’t be pleasant surely?  Actually it can be.  Many patients report feelings of deep relaxation or warmth.  This video featuring my colleague and good friend Deb Conner explains in a little more detail.

 

I’ll leave you with a final thought.  Nearly all acupuncturists in the UK are self employed or in private practise.  Our patients chose, not only to come to see us, but also to keep coming back.  The results are part of this but I can assure you, if we were hurting people left right and centre I’m sure we’d be out of business very quickly.

Still not convinced?  Give me a call without pressure or obligation.

 

Can I donate blood if I’ve had acupuncture?

At present you must wait 4 months before donating blood if you have had acupuncture.

British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) registered practitioners confirm to very high standards of clinical practice as a condition of membership and we are working as a professional body to encourage the National Blood Service to change this condition of donation.

The BAcC was recently accredited by the Professional Standards Authority, an independent body accountable to government. It sets high standards for voluntary registers such as BAcC and it is hoped that this recent recognition will help in ongoing negotiations to allow patients of BAcC registered practitioners to donate blood without a waiting period. At present however you would be prohibited from donating until a 4 month period has lapsed since your last treatment.